9 Easy Rules Of Psychology Examples | psychology examples

If you are interested in learning about marketing psychology or more specifically learning about promotional psychology, there are a number of good resources online that can be used as psychology examples. One of the most popular and effective websites for finding information is Psychology Examples. There you will find a large selection of different companies and products you can use as an example. For example, if you are looking to create new marketing campaigns, you can learn about how different companies go about marketing their business through various techniques. On the other hand, if you have an existing marketing campaign and are interested in changing the overall strategy, you can read about some of the ways that different companies target their customers.

If you are interested in marketing psychology but do not know where to begin, one of the best places to start is with the concept of levers. When we refer to levers, these are simply devices or things that can be turned in a certain direction. In the context of marketing psychology, a lever is something that can be turned to improve a particular action or outcome, whether it is the product sales you want or the customer satisfaction you are interested in. In this article, we will take a look at several examples of leverages and how they can be applied to marketing psychology.

In marketing psychology, behavior is everything and understanding what behaviors are often a great way to get at the underlying psychology of the buyer. In this case, one of the examples we will look at is how the customer's shopping behavior relates to the marketing message. Basically, when someone shops, they are engaging in behavior that has been shaped by the message they received as well as their prior knowledge and expectations. By understanding this basic shopping behavior, a successful marketing campaign can be developed.

If you have not already, it would probably be worth your while to read through this article a few times just so you can get a better idea of the different approaches behavioral psychologists use to understand consumer psychology. Basically, you will need to understand the difference between behavioral and situational framing. What you are looking for in each case is the way in which the consumer's behaviors become context-dependent. For instance, while a flyer that features the company's logo is likely to create a totally different experience than one featuring the logo of a competitor, the flyer with the rival's logo will likely evoke completely different behavioral responses from the same people. A good example of situational framing is when a candidate runs for office and touts his/her positive attributes as a key selling point.

Another example comes from within the social sciences. A group of researchers led by the late psychology pioneer Alfred Bandler sought to understand the psychology of trust. The original research set out to test whether people showed greater levels of trust in people who knew they were in financial trouble, such as job layoffs, death, or divorce. What they found was that people tended to act more generous when they perceived themselves as in a position of financial distress. They did not, however, tend to behave more generous when . . . . . . the situation was not as dire as the researchers claimed. This study, which uses psychological interpretations of real-world scenarios, is called contextualizing the meaning of trust and is an important sub-field of social psychology.

There are many more psychology examples, ranging from the study of behavior to the study of branding. No matter where you go in the world, it is nearly impossible to not come across a relevant study, experiment, or case study about some aspect of behavioral psychology, advertising, or marketing. It is therefore imperative that one keep abreast of the latest work on all aspects of human behavior. That way, they can be better prepared to respond to whatever phenomena crop up. A psychology course at any university is sure to give students access to such topics.

Real World Application of Health Psychology PM9 - psychology examples
Real World Application of Health Psychology PM9 – psychology examples | psychology examples

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9 Warm UP: What is Psychology? What is your definition? How would – psychology examples | psychology examples
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Psychology – psychology examples | psychology examples
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How to Write a Psychology Case Study – psychology examples | psychology examples
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Understanding a Schema in Psychology – psychology examples | psychology examples
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Classification of psychology (IEKO) – psychology examples | psychology examples
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Construct Validity in Psychology: Definition & Examples Video – psychology examples | psychology examples
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Types of Psychological Theories – psychology examples | psychology examples
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Psychological Fixations and How They Develop – psychology examples | psychology examples