9 Common Myths About Erikson Psychology | erikson psychology

Erikson Psychology is an acronym for Erickson's Psychological Theory. The name itself indicates that this is a theory on psychological development. Erickson was a German-born academician and psychoanalysts known for his influential theory on human psychological development. He might be most famous for cooperating the term identity crisis. His son, Kai T. Erikson, also is a well known American sociologist.

The theory of Erikson is meant to be helpful to people as they go through adolescence and early adulthood. It is not a simplistic approach to developmental psychology. It contains elements of emotional intelligence, social skills, personality construction, emotional development, and parental therapy. It also includes the idea of modeling, which is an important aspect of treatment.

What it does is help children who need psychological counseling handle the conflicts in their lives that come to experience different kinds of changing emotions. It also deals with the problem of having to adjust to new environmental circumstances that make children feel uncomfortable, nervous, or lost. All children have these feelings and they are natural. But when they are aggravated by lack of parental guidance, education, or guidance from the community on which they depend for their basic needs, developmental psychology like Erikson's theory can help solve these problems.

Erikson's work has been critiqued, among others, by several notable psychologists. Richard Bandler, John Bowlby, James conjecture, and John Coleman have criticized parts of Erikson's book, The Peculiar Children. These criticisms range from the author's supposition that children are “peculiar” to the overemphasis on outward appearance. In addition, some of the problems of parents in letting children be too independent also are criticized. However, some of these criticisms are valid.

A more valid criticism concerns the treatment of children with developmental disabilities. These children are often subjected to such treatment that can actually delay the development. A prime example of this is how many children are so desperate for attention that they will latch on to any odd or strange behavior that they may experience. This can cause them harm in the long run, or may cause them to do things that they would not normally do, such as break bones. Other forms of abuse are also associated with developmental disabilities.

With this said, Erikson's work can be valuable to those therapists working with children who are struggling with emotional or behavioral problems. It can offer developmental planning . . . . . . and treatment plans that are able to address the real issues behind the symptoms of these children rather than focusing on external factors. It can also help make developmental therapies more effective for children who are suffering from developmental disabilities.

Human Development - Psychology - Fort Wayne - Ivy Tech Libraries - erikson psychology
Human Development – Psychology – Fort Wayne – Ivy Tech Libraries – erikson psychology | erikson psychology

Magnolia The Therapy Dog: Erik Erickson: A Therapy Dog’s View – erikson psychology | erikson psychology
Frankenstein’s Monster, Doomed From the Start? Natalie Fox – erikson psychology | erikson psychology
Erikson’s Stages – PSYCH-MENTAL HEALTH NP – erikson psychology | erikson psychology
B
B | erikson psychology
Erik Erikson Department of Psychology - erikson psychology
Erik Erikson Department of Psychology – erikson psychology | erikson psychology
Little Hearts/Gentle Parenting Resources in 9 Erickson stages - erikson psychology
Little Hearts/Gentle Parenting Resources in 9 Erickson stages – erikson psychology | erikson psychology
Erik Erikson Psychosocial Development Psychology notes, Stages - erikson psychology
Erik Erikson Psychosocial Development Psychology notes, Stages – erikson psychology | erikson psychology
Erik Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development – erikson psychology | erikson psychology